Programming

Assembly #03: Intro to 6502 Instruction Set

This video introduces the 56 op-codes in the 6502 assembly language instruction set, and gives examples of the commonly used ones, using a Commodore 128 monitor. Here’s the list of op-codes divided up by function. This is the third video in my ongoing 6502 assembly language series. If you’re not familiar with the 6502 hardware, or with binary math and bitwise operations, check out the two previous videos in the series for info on those.

Intro to Binary & Hexadecimal and Bitwise Operations

I’ll be doing videos to demonstrate the 6502 instructions soon, and you can’t understand several of them without a basic understanding of binary math. It’s not hard, but it’s something that isn’t taught in math classes anymore, or is touched on as a concept but not really absorbed. This video demonstrates how to write binary numbers and translate them to decimal, how to add them, and how to convert to hexadecimal (base 16).

Intro to 6502 Assembly Language Programming

I plan to do some demonstrations of assembly language programming, so I thought I’d do a short intro. This is about the 6502 family of microprocessors, which were used in many computers of the 1980s, and are still produced by the millions for embedded hardware and hobby projects. The 6502 is a pretty easy CPU to program, because it has a fairly small set of instructions, and yet it’s powerful enough to do interesting things.

C Programming: Tic-Tac-Toe Simulator - Part 4

The fourth and final video in the series. I add the ability to ask for a number of games on the command line, do some final cleanup of the code and testing, and push it all to my gitlab repository. I intend to do more programming videos, so if you have suggestions or questions, please send them to aaron@baugher.biz. I may try some live streaming so it would be possible to interact in more of a classroom manner, if these generate any interest in that.

C Programming: Tic-Tac-Toe Simulator - Part 3

This is the one where I spend an embarrassing amount of time figuring out how exactly to avoid losing a game of tic-tac-toe. Got it figured out, though. Now the players are smart enough to force a tie every time. In Part 4 I’ll clean up the code somewhat, add a few more features, and maybe talk about what comes next in the series. Part 1 Part 2 Part 4 tttbot repository

C Programming: Tic-Tac-Toe Simulator - Part 2

Here in part 2 I write most of the code, getting the program to where it can simulate one game. The AI is very dumb at this point, on purpose, so I could make sure the win and block conditions worked correctly. Part 3 will make it smart enough to produce all tie games, clean up the code, and do any debugging. This isn’t a tutorial, so I’m not trying to teach C in it, though that’s something I may tackle at another time.

C Programming: Tic-Tac-Toe Simulator - Part 1

This the first part in a series of videos on C programming, which will walk the viewer through programming a tic-tac-toe simulator (a program which has the computer play against itself, a la War Games). I will be making it up as I go along, so you’ll get to see how the sausage is made, from designing to debugging. I hope that doesn’t result in too many long pauses as I think about things, or too many times of backing up and starting over, but we’ll see.

Simple Comparison of Some Programming Languages

As I say in the video, I get asked now and then what programming language a person should learn. I thought I’d put together a simple demonstration of several, to show some of the similarities and differences, and why it’s a good idea to be proficient in more than one. I’m also trying something new in using my phone as a webcam. Works okay, though it does add a short delay.

Design Notes on a MULE-type Game

I’ve been playing some Stardew Valley lately. I got it from gog.com for $15, which is the most I’ve spent on a game in a long time. It’s a very well-made game, and even more impressive when you find out it was done by one man. Not many people can code well enough to make a complete game work, and do good graphics, and do good music, etc. Most games are made by teams of people with different skills, and when one skill is missing, it shows.